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In Its Haste to Pass the Juvenile Justice Bill, the Parliament has Weakened Itself

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Four days ago, the juvenile involved in the gang rape of Jyoti Singh on 16 December 2012 completed the three-year sentence he had been awarded in August 2013 by a district court in Delhi. The juvenile’s release and the subsequent protests brought the Juvenile Justice Bill into the limelight.

On 22 December 2015, the Rajya Sabha concluded a grueling debate that lasted over five hours by passing the Juvenile Justice (Care and Protection of Children) Bill, 2015. The bill, which was cleared by the Lok Sabha earlier this year in May, now awaits presidential sanction to become a law. Once the president gives his assent, juveniles who are between 16 to 18 years old and have committed heinous crimes—those that are punishable with a minimum of seven years under the Indian Penal Code—would be penalised as adults. The Rajya Sabha’s decision was met with mixed reactions. However, closer scrutiny of the process of passing the bill, and the new law’s implications, should raise concerns about such institutional responses to public outcry.

In the debate over the release of the juvenile accused of Jyoti Singh’s rape, a role reversal occurred. As the victim’s family reclaimed their loved one’s identity, the perpetrator hid his.

Four days ago, the juvenile involved in the gang rape of Jyoti Singh on 16 December 2012 completed the three-year sentence he had been awarded in August 2013 by a district court in Delhi. The juvenile’s release and the subsequent protests brought the Juvenile Justice Bill into the limelight. Most people demanded that the Rajya Sabha pass the new bill that the Minister for Women and Child Development Maneka Gandhi had introduced in August last year. Many public figures contributed to this collective outrage. The chairperson of the Delhi Commission for Women, Swati Maliwal, for instance, claimed that the juvenile would have been tried as an adult and received the punishment he deserved had the Rajya Sabha expedited the passage of the new bill. This was completely inaccurate since laws cannot be applied retrospectively. Meanwhile, celebrities such as Bollywood actor Farhan Akhtar and musician Vishal Dadlani, who actively engage with the country’s political discourse, put forward the unconstitutional proposition of retrying the juvenile as an adult. Such sweeping statements illustrate how influential people fuelled public anger with misinformation, instead of engaging with it effectively.

This image has been used for representational purposes only.

Deepa Kumar is the founder of GrassRoute India, an independent, non-partisan organisation that enables dialogue between citizens and MPs. She tracks and writes on Indian legislation and policy.

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One thought on “In Its Haste to Pass the Juvenile Justice Bill, the Parliament has Weakened Itself”

Very Well Written piece Deepa.
With 12 year olds knowing much more about how to operate a smartphone and getting to know about birds and bees much earlier than before, becoming aware of differences between good and bad., whats wrong in dealing strictly withyear olds 16 in case of ‘Henious’ crimes?
Moreover provisions have been made to assure that these cases are dealt on case by case basis., though more fine tuning is necessary.
An individual is old enough to rape, kill, abuse a girl, but when it comes to punishing him/her, suddenly child rights and human rights come into picture?